In year geological history and was also known

In 2014, it was announced that 81% of the United States’ gas emissions were carbon dioxide of a resulting 405.67 ppm (Blakemore, 2017). This gas has been said to be in the atmosphere for over 4 billion years almost reaching earth’s 4.6 billion year geological history and was also known to be in much larger proportions up to 80% responsible of the enhanced effect. It’s known that carbon dioxide more specifically atmospheric carbon dioxide comes from a lot of natural sources such as volcanic eruptions, decay of plants and also as a waste product of animal respiration (Weather Centre). Carbon dioxide levels were much more higher in the past than now due to more chemicals challenging atmospheric carbon and because the natural processes are too slow compared to those other chemicals (deis.nas). During a conference on Climate Variability in 2006, there was strong evidence shown from scientists that there were more radiation activity varying wavelengths being shown that was occuring due to the contribution of specific greenhouse gases using something called spectrometers which are tools that measure spectra to identify particular wavelengths. It was also found that greenhouse gas radiation increased by 3.5 watts per square meter compare it to pre industrial times (Pappas, 2017). Another reason for there being a higher amount of carbon dioxide released in the past is because of frequent volcano eruptions mainly during the precambrian period which is the earliest part of earth’s history. On average volcanoes release between 130 and 230 million tons of carbon dioxide per year into the atmosphere. A good example were the two major volcanic eruptions that took place in El Chichon in 1982 and Pinatubo in 1991 which released sulfur dioxide gas extremely high into the atmosphere which ended being converted into tiny particles that eventually spread through the atmosphere for more than a year reflecting sunlight and shading earth’s surface (Global Warming, n.d).